Understanding about needle felted figures needs wool


When creating three or pictures dimensional forms, the standard point to needle felt with is wool fiber and that is because the outcomes are consistent and beautiful. Accents can be inserted with artificial yarns, etc. While the main body of this work is wool. Needle felted items are extremely tactile, great to touch or hold in the hand. You can needle felt anything, right? Well, you can certainly try. Those magic needles will permeate a lot of things, including your fingers some matters will felt to each other easily, some not so readily. Industrial needle felting can be used to create things like carpet underlay and boot liners and quilt batting, to mention but a few. These, as you may know, aren’t often wool. Crafters and artists select the wool that will give the best results for your job they are doing, so here is a guide to wools and what have found works best for images and 3d forms.

gourd art design

Each breed of sheep has a different sort of wool. It depends upon where the sheep lives, what it eats, etc. Wool is measured in microns. The best wool could have the lowest amount, 10 microns being quite nice merino. This fine fiber is fantastic for turning and wet felting, but hard work to needle felt. The longer, finer fibers require a very long time to felt along with the needle and the work keeps a fluffy appearance. My preferred wools are corriedale, mixed bred, Romney and coarse merino. Corriedale wool is soft, yet needle felts well. This fiber will work up quickly and create a smooth finish to the piece. Mixed bred is just as it sounds, coming from a mixed breed of sheep. The wool is fantastic for needle felting, being rather primitive. Finn wool from Finland and Gotland behave similarly. I said merino as being overly nice, but merino comes from several microns. The heavier merino, that has been carded and made into bats, has a rougher appearance and needle felts really well.

Leicester and alpaca that isn’t a sheep, being associated with llamas are also great for needle felting. Alpaca tends to be costly, but if someone offers you some, give it a go. Wool called core fiber is usually undone wool in a natural color like white or gray. It may be coarser and frequently has pieces of grass in it. All the fibers have discussed will also wet and twist felt beautifully, so if someone does not work to your needle felting, try wet felting it is an interesting exercise to check out the different procedures of working with unique fibers. I hope this report has given you a guide to use when choosing fiber for needle felting. It is by no means a comprehensive list of fibers, only those I prefer to work with. Have fun and experiment with this very satisfying craft. Visit here www.ragtimefarm.com know more information about needle felted figures.